ADHD and ADD: What are they?

ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurological/psychological disorder and is one of the most common mental disorders affecting children and adults; with an estimated 8.4% of children and 2.5% of adults having ADHD. It is more common in boys than girls. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a condition that includes symptoms such as a short attention span (inattentiveness), constantly fidgeting (hyperactivity) and acting without thinking (impulsiveness). It can be treated with medicines and talking therapies.

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dyslexia

Dyslexia

In the late 1800’s, Dyslexia was known as “word blindness”. German neurologist, Adolf Kussmaul, was the first to recognise the condition and explained is as “complete text blindness, although intellect and the power of sight and speech are intact”. Kussmaul worked with children and noted that although they displayed extreme reading difficulties, they were otherwise very able. It was in the year 1887 that the term ‘Dyslexia’ was penned by German ophthalmologist Rudolf Berlin and was used then, as it is now, to describe the condition (meaning ‘difficulty with words’).

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Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity refers to variation in the human brain regarding sociability, learning, attention, mood, and other mental functions in a non-pathological sense. The term was created in 1998 by sociologist Judy Singer and journalist Harvey Blume. The term helps to promote the view that neurological differences are to be recognised and respected as any other human variation. It is also used to counter negative social connotations that currently exist and to make it easier for people of all neurotypes to contribute to the world as they are, rather than attempting to think or appear more 'typically'.

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dyspraxia

Dyspraxia

Neurodiversity refers to variation in the human brain regarding sociability, learning, attention, mood, and other mental functions in a non-pathological sense. The term was created in 1998 by sociologist Judy Singer and journalist Harvey Blume. The term helps to promote the view that neurological differences are to be recognised and respected as any other human variation. It is also used to counter negative social connotations that currently exist and to make it easier for people of all neurotypes to contribute to the world as they are, rather than attempting to think or appear more 'typically'.

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